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Cda Competancy Goals(from the Edpro Website) Essay

How Educational Productions’ Video-Based Training Programs Address CDA Competency Goals GOAL I: To establish and maintain a safe, healthy, and responsive learning environment. FUNCTIONAL AREA 3: Learning Environment Candidate uses space, relationships, materials, and routines as resources for constructing an interesting, secure and enjoyable environment that encourages play, exploration and learning. Space to Grow, from the GOOD TALKING WITH YOU series, shows how learning centers are a place for children to engage with one another and for sta? to enrich learning.

Viewers see: ¦ ¦ ¦ What elements in the environment help children feel comfortable and competent How to arrange materials to help children act independently Learning centers that support language, cognitive, motor and social skills with special emphasis on language acquisition. How to set up e? ective learning centers, including block area, art area, sensory table, carpentry area, dramatic play and language arts areas ¦ Come Join In! , from the SUPER GROUPS series, demonstrates how teachers involve children in activities and adjust their responses to children’s varying abilities.

Techniques critical for holding a group’s attention and preventing disruptions include: ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ How to choose activities based on a group’s interests and language abilities Guidelines that increase involvement, participation and learning How to add interactivity to every element of the group experience How to support and encourage each child’s contribution Give Yourself a Hand, from the SUPER GROUPS series, shows that children will engage in activities and manage more readily when they clearly understand what to expect and what is expected of them.

Core strategies that enable children to self-manage at group time include: ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ How predictable formats and routines help avoid discipline problems The value of clearly and consistently transmitting group time expectations Techniques for encouraging positive behaviors How to deal with guidance problems when they occur Child’s Play, in the PLAY POWER series, shows how children at play continually experiment, discover and stretch to learn more. Providing children with rich and varied play experiences is the very best way to support learning and development.

Viewers will learn: ¦ How play helps build thinking and language skills, large and small motor skills and social-emotional skills How play helps children prepare for academic learning and supports the development of literacy How children playing gradually builds the foundation for reading and writing through growth in oral language, learning to love books and gaining an understanding of print. Educational Productions 1 ¦ ¦ CDA Goal: I Functional Area: 3 Connecting with Every Child, from the REFRAMING DISCIPLINE series.

Vivid scenes show that children who feel a connection with their teachers are more likely to follow classroom rules, work cooperatively and behave appropriately. Techniques that build the kind of relationships that can change classroom dynamics include: ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ Ways to nurture trusting relationships How to spend time on the positive, not the negative How to convey value and respect Techniques that foster connection When a Child Doesn’t Play, from the HAND-IN-HAND series, presents a unique model for identifying children in the play environment who are missing out on learning.

Viewers will also learn: ¦ How to adapt curriculum to individual needs When a Child Appears Anxious, from the HAND-IN-HAND series, reviews common reasons why a child might have little interest in play. ¦ How predictability and consistency in teacher behaviors and classroom routines help children feel secure The Power of Positive Communication (Video-based CD-ROM Training) provides modeling and practice in how to: ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ Transmit and reinforce expectations Support language and literacy development Model and teach social-emotional skills Reduce guidance and discipline problems

I Don’t Know Where to Start, from the STARTING POINTS series, for teachers of culturally diverse classrooms, highlights key practices that motivate children, help them engage in learning and reduce classroom management issues. These include: ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ What the research shows children need to be able to learn Basic techniques for building respectful, accepting communities How to create a classroom that re? ects all children’s lives To value a child’s ? rst language and culture Supporting Transitions, from the PREVENTING DISCIPLINE PROBLEMS series, teaches critical elements of planning and organizing that help create smooth transitions: ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦

How to prepare children for transitions Environmental cues that make transitions easier Transition techniques that eliminate wait time and confusion Simple strategies to make transitions fun Educational Productions 2 CDA Goal: II Functional Area: 5 GOAL II: To advance physical and intellectual competence. FUNCTIONAL AREA 5: Cognitive Candidate provides activities and opportunities that support curiosity, exploration, and problem solving appropriate to the developmental levels and learning styles of children. Read to Me! from the BIGGER THAN BOOKS series, shows the warmth and pleasure reading aloud brings to parents and children from 1 to 8 years old…. How much children learn as they listen to favorite stories, looking at pictures and noticing how words ? ow across the pages. ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ How being read to fosters a love of books How reading aloud helps children develop language and literacy skills How children who have been read to are most likely to succeed in school Basic guidelines for making read-aloud time stimulating and fun

Once Upon a Time, from the BIGGER THAN BOOKS series, demonstrates how to read to large and small groups and keep children of all ages hanging on every word. Here are the techniques that support understanding of language and concepts, clarify meaning and reveal the magic in every story. ¦ How to help children follow the chain of ideas by clarifying words and concepts and rereading favorite stories Techniques that get children actively involved so they have a deeper level of understanding and enjoyment ¦

Child’s Play, in the PLAY POWER series, shows how children at play continually experiment, discover and stretch to learn more. Viewers will learn: ¦ How play helps build thinking and language skills, large and small motor skills and social-emotional skills How play helps children prepare for academic learning and supports the development of literacy How children playing gradually builds the foundation for reading and writing through growth in oral language, learning to love books and gaining an understanding of print. ¦ ¦

Beginning Language Connections, from the FIRST STEPS series, supporting language development, birth to three, illustrates how: ¦ Language is the foundation for all academic and social skills and the basis for strong relationships with children Now You’re Talking, from the GOOD TALKING WITH YOU series, shows ways to extend conversations and expand learning: ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ What topics children want to talk about How to add to the child’s topic and extend conversation How to ask questions that stimulate thinking and problem solving How to support all of a child’s e? rts to communicate Educational Productions 3 CDA Goal: II Functional Area: 5 The Child Who Wanders, from the HAND IN HAND series, shows how skilled teachers work with children of varying abilities and needs, encouraging them to stay longer and become more engaged in learning. ¦ How intervention strategies are based on goals designed to help children develop new skills and competencies How to help a child create and follow a plan for playing with materials and peers Three techniques to help a child who wanders feel more con? dent and able to make play choices ¦ ¦

The Child Who Dabbles, from the HAND IN HAND series, teaches techniques that encourage children to play with greater depth… to persist with activities, to experiment and discover on their own. ¦ ¦ Interventions that can be used to help a child sustain interest in exploring play Interventions that can be used to help a child with limited play skills take risks and experiment with more complex play Strategies that use peer support and the play environment to add depth and involvement to a child’s play ¦ The Power of Positive Communication (Video-based CD-ROM Training) provides modeling and practice in how to: ¦ ¦ ¦

Support language and literacy development Meet key learning goals, standards and benchmarks Understand new language and concepts Nurturing Responsible Behavior, in the PREVENTING DISCIPLINE PROBLEMS series, teaches how to help children manage new challenges and increase their problem-solving skills. It demonstrates how to gently shift responsibility to children and coach them toward success. ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ How to recognize situations where children can take responsibility How to ask questions that encourage children to take action How to allow time for children to take the next step Strategies to support each child’s success

Educational Productions 4 CDA Goal: II Functional Area: 6 GOAL II: To advance physical and intellectual competence. FUNCTIONAL AREA 6: Communications Candidate actively communicates with children and provides opportunities and support for children to understand, acquire, and use verbal and nonverbal means of communicating thoughts and feelings. Beginning Language Connections, from the FIRST STEPS series, reveals how adults’ interactions with infants and toddlers are key to their language learning, the foundation for all academic and social skills. Delightful scenes focus viewers’ attention on how the back and forth ? w of communication: ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ Children begin to communicate and learn language from birth Adults’ responsive interactions with children are a critical link in their language learning process Adults need to tune in to each child’s unique way of communicating Responding to children’s early communication attempts encourages them to continue re? ning and expanding their language skills. Reading the Child’s Message, from the FIRST STEPS series, points out how stress, delays or special needs can make a child’s communication messages harder to read, and how persistence pays o?.

The video shows many examples of nonverbal communication, subtle cues and mixed messages. Some typical messages children send are subtle and easy to overlook: ¦ ¦ ¦ Infants and toddlers use sounds, facial expressions and gestures to try to communicate When children are experiencing stress, delays or special needs, their messages may be hard to read It’s common to misinterpret a child’s communication attempts when accompanying behaviors seem inappropriate or inconsistent Building a strong communication link with a child is a trial and error process; adults can begin by tuning in and trying to respond to the child’s message Talking with Young Children, from the FIRST STEPS series, models Information Talk, a simple yet powerful support technique. Information Talk is providing word labels for what children are seeing, doing, thinking or feeling: ¦ ¦ ¦ Children must build language understanding before they use words, signs or other means of expression Talking to children and providing words for their experiences helps them begin to understand language How to use Information Talk, a simple technique to provide language for what a child is doing, thinking or feeling How to communicate more e? ctively by getting down to the child’s level, making eye contact and using facial expressions and gestures ¦ Building Conversations, from the FIRST STEPS series, shows animated exchanges with verbal and nonverbal children that draw them into the turn-taking rhythm of conversations. Engaging scenes demonstrate how to dialogue with infants and toddlers using words, gestures and facial expressions: ¦ By listening to and participating in conversations, children learn how we use language to share information, ideas and feelings Children need to be involved in conversations long before they have words.

Even infants will participate We can draw young children into conversations by focusing on their interests and by following their lead When we help children learn how to take turns, we give them a key skill needed for successful conversations Educational Productions 5 ¦ ¦ ¦ CDA Goal: II Functional Area: 6 Oh Say What They See, from the GOOD TALKING WITH YOU series, gives an overview of language stimulation techniques. It shows how language develops and the pivotal role adults have in the process.

A dramatic before-and-after sequence shows how a child makes progress when his mother learns support techniques. ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ How children acquire language How we help children build receptive and expressive language by talking with them How to help children build vocabulary by giving them word labels for things they touch and see How to follow a child’s lead in conversations and encourage talking Let’s Talk, in the GOOD TALKING WITH YOU series, helps you teach viewers how to start conversations, even with children they are just getting to know, by tuning in to their interests and needs. ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦

Key communication skills that invite children and encourage talking How to start a conversation of interest to a child How to avoid asking questions that stop conversations How to correct a child’s speech/language errors in a positive way Now You’re Talking, in the GOOD TALKING WITH YOU series, shows adults taking conversations to the next level, drawing children out and keeping them involved. ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ What topics children want to talk about How to add to the child’s topic and extend conversation How to ask questions that stimulate thinking and problem solving How to support all of a child’s e? rts to communicate Between You and Me, in the GOOD TALKING WITH YOU series, shows how to facilitate so children can communicate, make their wants and needs known and practice working together. ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ How to help children attend to each other in conversations How to help children establish and maintain a topic How to refer questions and comments from one child to another How to interpret for children who lack speech or language skills Getting Your Message Across, from the STARTING POINTS series, for culturally diverse classrooms, presents a number of communications strategies to boost understanding.

In addition to explaining the importance of slowing down and checking for understanding, the video models simple nonverbal techniques, the cues and signals that accentuate meaning: ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ An array of gestures to increase understanding Visuals and real objects that help children make connections Modeling A judicious balance of listening/processing with active, hands-on activities Bringing Language Alive, from the STARTING POINTS series, shows key elements of ? rst and second language acquisition as well as the simple, but powerful, strategies that enable both second language learners and native English speakers to construct meaning.

The viewer sees dozens of examples of language acquisition activities integrated across the curriculum. ¦ How to expand comprehension and vocabulary Educational Productions 6 CDA Goal: II Functional Area: 6 ¦ ¦ ¦ How hands-on experiences deepen language understanding How repetition builds language and concepts How to access and use children’s prior knowledge Once Upon a Time, from the BIGGER THAN BOOKS series, demonstrates how to read to… keep children of all ages hanging on every word.

Here are the techniques that support understanding of language and concepts, clarify meaning and reveal the magic in every story. ¦ ¦ How to use voice, pacing, gestures and eye contact to draw children into each story How to help children follow the chain of ideas by clarifying words and concepts and rereading favorite stories The Power of Positive Communication (Video-based CD-ROM Training) provides models of how to support language and literacy development. It includes opportunities for trainees to practice techniques that help children to: ¦ ¦ ¦

Understand new language and concepts Experience less confusion and frustration Follow directions and manage routines Educational Productions 7 CDA Goal: II Functional Area: 7 GOAL II: To advance physical and intellectual competence. FUNCTIONAL AREA 7: Creative Candidate provides opportunities that stimulate children to play with sound, rhythm, language, materials, space and ideas in individual ways and to express their creative abilities. Time Together, from the PLAY POWER series, presents simple techniques that enable adults to become play partners with children, including: ¦ ¦ ¦

When to join a child’s play and when to step back–learning the level of involvement that is appropriate How to follow the child’s lead during play-ways to avoid taking over a child’s play How to help children focus on their play so they can stay involved–to explore, discover and learn more Read to Me! , from the BIGGER THAN BOOKS series. How much children learn as they listen to favorite stories, looking at pictures and noticing how words ? ow across the pages. ¦ Basic guidelines for making read-aloud time stimulating and fun

The Child that Dabbles, from the HAND IN HAND series, teaches techniques that encourage children…to experiment and discover on their own. ¦ ¦ Interventions that can be used to help a child sustain interest in exploring play Interventions that can be used to help a child with limited play skills take risks and experiment with more complex play When A Child Appears Anxious, from the HAND-IN-HAND series, reminds viewers that while a few children may require outside help, most show renewed interest in activities once they feel more comfortable. ¦ The value of playfulness in learning and how to use the curriculum to nurture playfulness

Educational Productions 8 CDA Goal: III Functional Area: 8 GOAL III: To support social and emotional development and to provide positive guidance. FUNCTIONAL AREA 8: Self Candidate provides physical and emotional security for each child and helping each child to know, accept and take pride in himself or herself and to develop a sense of independence. I Don’t Know Where to Start, from the STARTING POINTS series, for teachers of culturally diverse classrooms, highlights: ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ Basic techniques for building respectful, accepting communities How to create a classroom that re? cts all children’s lives Why partnering with families is key to educating their children To value a child’s ? rst language and culture When a Child Doesn’t Play, from the HAND-IN-HAND series, demonstrates how to ¦ ¦ ¦ Build trust with each child Validate feelings and needs Nurture self-esteem and con? dence When a Child Appears Anxious, from the HAND-IN-HAND series, will help you show that understanding children’s concerns [is] critical to providing appropriate support. ¦ ¦ How accepting and validating a child’s feelings are basic to reducing discomfort Ways to develop a trusting relationship with a child that fosters con? ence and self-esteem The Child Who Is Ignored, from the HAND-IN-HAND series, appeals to viewers who remember that a child who is consistently ignored can quickly begin to feel defeated or unliked. This program includes: ¦ Ways to enhance a child’s self-image as a valuable member of the classroom and contributor to play groups Understanding Di? cult Behavior, from the REFRAMING DISCIPLINE series, shows how to gather information, adjust expectations and individualize interventions for children with di? erent skill levels. ¦ How meeting a child’s needs can break patterns of misbehavior

Space to Grow, from the GOOD TALKING WITH YOU series, demonstrates how to create learning centers…. Viewers see: ¦ ¦ What elements in the environment help children feel comfortable and competent How to arrange materials to help children act independently Nurturing Responsible Behavior, from the PREVENTING DISCIPLINE PROBLEMS series, teaches how to gently shift responsibility to children and coach them toward success. ¦ ¦ How to recognize situations where children can take responsibility Strategies to support each child’s success

The Power of Positive Communication (Video-based CD-ROM training) sessions demonstrate: ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ Why positive communication counts How to give positive messages Tone of voice, pacing, gestures The impact of negative language Educational Productions 9 CDA Goal: III Functional Area: 9 GOAL III: To support social and emotional development and to provide positive guidance. FUNCTIONAL AREA 9: Social Candidate helps each child feels accepted in the group, helps children learn to communicate and get along with others, and encourages feelings of empathy and mutual respect among children and adults.

Between You and Me, in the GOOD TALKING WITH YOU series, teaches adults to be a link. Limited language and social skills keep many children from interacting, often causing frustration and disruptive behavior. Now, teach your viewers how to facilitate so children can communicate, make their wants and needs known and practice working together. ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ How to help children attend to each other in conversations How to help children establish and maintain a topic How to refer questions and comments from one child to another How to interpret for children who lack speech or language skills

When a Child Doesn’t Play, from the HAND-IN-HAND series, demonstrates how to support children who are shy or timid, children who can’t engage…with classmates and children who act out in frustration or anger. ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ Support emerging language skills and teach negotiation Validate feelings and needs Nurture self-esteem and con? dence Increase awareness of others’ feelings The Child Who Appears Aloof, from the HAND-IN-HAND series, helps viewers determine what social skills might enable each child to join in more easily.

It helps viewers learn how to develop strategies to teach missing skills, enabling children to interact more comfortably one-on-one and in groups. ¦ Strategies for bringing children who appear aloof into play so they can work with others and learn new skills How to use peers and the curriculum to support interactions between children The importance of encouraging families to bring children together outside of school to foster friendships ¦ ¦ The Child Who Is Ignored, from the HAND-IN-HAND series, describes children who are ignored can seem almost invisible to their classmates.

They may lack a repertoire for getting others’ attention and showing they have something to contribute. This program demonstrates how to facilitate play, linking children together and coaching them to communicate more e? ectively, including: ¦ ¦ ¦ How to help children learn communication skills, like initiating and responding to peers How to help children ? nd ways to enter and become part of play groups Curriculum activities that bring children together and encourage them to interact The Child Who is Rejected, from the HAND-IN-HAND series, shows how skilled teachers support more successful interactions, including: ¦ ¦ ¦

How to determine the skills a child needs to be more accepted by others How to help children learn to take turns and negotiate for what they need Strategies to sensitize a group to the feelings and concerns of the rejected child Educational Productions 10 CDA Goal: III Functional Area: 9 The Power of Positive Communication (Video-based CD-ROM Training) provides speci? c demonstration and practice in how to: ¦ ¦ ¦ Model and teach social-emotional skills Follow directions and manage routines Learn to cooperate and get along with others

I Don’t Know Where to Start, from the STARTING POINTS series, for teachers of culturally diverse classrooms, highlights: ¦ ¦ ¦ Basic techniques for building respectful, accepting communities How using buddies helps to support children How to create a classroom that re? ects all children’s lives Educational Productions 11 CDA Goal: III Functional Area: 10 GOAL III: To support social and emotional development and to provide positive guidance. FUNCTIONAL AREA 10: Guidance Candidate provides a supportive environment in which children can begin to learn and practice appropriate and acceptable behaviors as individuals and as a group.

Building a Prevention Strategy, from the PREVENTING DISCIPLINE PROBLEMS series, gets viewers to look at day-to-day struggles from a new perspective and see how many they can prevent. Here is a proactive approach to identifying and teaching positive behaviors that keep crises at bay. Viewers will learn: ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ To shift focus from problem behaviors to positive behaviors How to transmit positive expectations clearly How to help children practice positive behaviors How to encourage and promote prosocial actions Supporting Transitions, from the PREVENTING DISCIPLINE PROBLEMS series, explains key reasons why children have di? ulty during transitions, shows how to ease the way for the whole group and models how to individualize strategies for children who need more support. It teaches: ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ How to prepare children for transitions Environmental cues that make transitions easier Transition techniques that eliminate wait time and confusion Simple strategies to make transitions fun Nurturing Responsible Behavior, from the PREVENTING DISCIPLINE PROBLEMS series, demonstrates how to gently shift responsibility to children and coach them toward success: ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦

How to recognize situations where children can take responsibility How to ask questions that encourage children to take action How to allow time for children to take the next step Strategies to support each child’s success Doing the Groundwork, from the REFRAMING DISCIPLINE series, a respectful, non-threatening way and help teachers to examine their attitudes and practices. Viewers will learn: ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ How reframing helps us work with, instead of against, misbehavior How to turn con? icts into teaching situations How to integrate discipline into the curriculum How to begin to work with di? ult behaviors Connecting with Every Child, from the REFRAMING DISCIPLINE series. Vivid scenes show that children who feel a connection with their teachers are more likely to follow classroom rules, work cooperatively and behave appropriately. Techniques that focus on the positive, not the negative, build the kind of relationships that can change classroom dynamics. Viewers learn: ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ How to convey value and respect How to support children who are upset How to acknowledge feelings Techniques that foster connection Educational Productions 12

CDA Goal: III Functional Area: 10 Understanding Di? cult Behavior, from the REFRAMING DISCIPLINE series, teaches a process for understanding a child’s behavior. It examines: ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ Common causes of misbehavior How to look at the context and pattern of misbehavior How to consider a child’s development in setting expectations How meeting a child’s needs can break patterns of misbehavior Between You and Me, in the GOOD TALKING WITH YOU series, teaches how to facilitate so children can communicate, make their wants and needs known and practice working together. ¦ ¦ ¦

How to help children attend to each other in conversations How to refer questions and comments from one child to another How to interpret for children who lack speech or language skills The Child Who is Ignored, from the HAND-IN-HAND series, demonstrates how to facilitate play, linking children together and coaching them to communicate more e? ectively. Included are: ¦ Ways to enhance a child’s self-image as a valuable member of the classroom and contributor to play groups How to help children learn communication skills, like initiating and responding to peers How to help children ? d ways to enter and become part of play groups Curriculum activities that bring children together and encourage them to interact ¦ ¦ ¦ The Child Who is Rejected, from the HAND-IN-HAND series, shows how skilled teachers support more successful interactions, including: ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ How to determine the skills a child needs to be more accepted by others How to help children who are rejected to become more aware of their classmates and learn to share How to help children learn to take turns and negotiate for what they need Strategies to sensitize a group to the feelings and concerns of the rejected child

The Power of Positive Communication (Video-based CD-ROM Training) provides speci? c training in how reduce guidance and discipline problems. It teaches how to transmit and reinforce expectations so that children: ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ Understand new language and concepts Follow directions and manage routines Experience less confusion and frustration Learn to cooperate and get along with others Give Yourself a Hand, from the SUPER GROUPS series, shows that children will engage in activities and manage more readily when they clearly understand what to expect and what is expected of them.

Core strategies that enable children to self-manage at group time, include: ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦ How predictable formats and routines help avoid discipline problems The value of clearly and consistently transmitting group time expectations Techniques for encouraging positive behaviors How to deal with guidance problems when they occur Educational Productions 13 CDA Goal: IV Functional Area: 11 GOAL IV: To establish positive and productive relationships with families.

FUNCTIONAL AREA 11: Families Candidate maintains an open, friendly, and cooperative relationship with each child’s family, encourages encourages their involvement in the program, and supports the child’s relationship with his or her family. I Don’t Know Where to Start, from the STARTING POINTS series, for teachers of culturally diverse classrooms, highlights key practices that motivate children, help them engage in learning and reduce classroom management issues. These include: ¦ ¦ ¦ ¦

Basic techniques for building respectful, accepting communities How to create a classroom that re? ects all children’s lives Why partnering with families is key to educating their children To value a child’s ? rst language and culture When a Child Appears Anxious, from the HAND-IN-HAND series, will help you show that understanding children’s concerns and open communication with families are critical to providing appropriate support, including: ¦ Ways to develop a trusting relationship with a child that fosters con? ence and self-esteem The Child Who Appears Aloof, from the HAND-IN-HAND series, shows how to nurture social skills, including: ¦ The importance of encouraging families to bring children together outside of school to foster friendships Educational Productions 14 I II V 12 III Relevant to CDA Competencies Educational Productions’ Video-Based Training Programs VI 13 IV 11 4 1 1 4 4 10 4 4 4 4 4 4 4 CDA EP 9 3 3 4 3 3 3 8 4 1 2 4 3 2 1 7 2 1 6 3 4 4 4 4 5 3 4 3 3 1 4 3 4 4 4 4 1 2 1 InspireWorks!

Doing the Groundwork The Child Who Dabbles Connecting with Every Child Understanding Di? cult Behavior Building a Prevention Strategy Supporting Transitions Nurturing Responsible Behavior I Don’t Know Where to Start Getting Your Message Across Bringing Language Alive! When a Child Doesn’t Play The Child Who Wanders The Child Who Appears Anxious The Child Who Appears Aloof The Child Who is Ignored The Child Who is Rejected Beginning Language Connections Reading the Child’s Message Talking with Young Children Building Conversations

Note: Scores of 3 and 4 indicate that most of the program directly addresses this functional area. 4 4 4 Come Join In! Give Yourself a Hand Once Upon a Time Oh Say What They See Let’s Talk A summary showing the relative number of viewer outcomes in each video that are relevant to a speci? c CDA Functional Area. 4 2 4 4 4 4 2 3 4 4 4 Phone: 800-950-4949 • Fax: 503-350-7000 • Website: www. edpro. com • Address: 9000 SW Gemini Dr. Beaverton, OR 97008 USA Now You’re Talking Between You and Me 2 1 2 3 4 2 3 4 3 Space to Grow Read to Me! Once Upon a Time Child’s Play Time Together

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